Tagged: David Sedaris

Homily Sunday after the shootings in Charleston

Each week Pam and I have been leading the afternoon service at St. Paul’s Manor as part of our theological field placement.   We alternate between officiating and delivering the homily.   This week it was my turn to give the homily.  I had a nice homily planned based on David and Goliath and then on Wednesday the tragic events surrounding the shooting of nine African-American people attending a bible study in Charleston, South Carolina stopped me in my tracks.   I felt uncomfortable with the homily I had written and felt called to talk about the events.   Late Saturday night I sat down and started over, writing from the heart.

victims-charleston-shooting

Homily given at St. Paul’s Manor, San Diego, Sunday 21st June 2015

Proper 7 RCL Year B
1 Samuel 17: 32-49; Psalm 9:9-20; 2 Corinthians 6:1-13; Mark 4:35-41

Across the nation today, many pastors, ministers and preachers will be trying to make sense of another mass loss of life that occurred in the week before.    In Charleston, South Carolina this week, nine lives were taken from members of the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church who were attending a bible study.  Emanuel is a historic church that was and is known for its activism and work for making the local community, the church and our nation a better place.  From all that we know, from what the police have reported and from what survivors have told us, this is a hate crime.   An act of hatred, hatred of African-American people.

We have been in this position before.

We have struggled to find the right words too many times.

Bishop Mathes in his letter to the people of the diocese this week wrote

“African-Americans in this country are in poverty because of racism. African-Americans are disproportionately in prison (our modern slavery) because of racism. African-Americans are being killed because of racism. Look at the statistics. Look at the history.“

As Christians we must do something.  We must act to transform the lives of our brothers and sisters who are suffering due to racism.

For those of us who use the Baptismal Covenant as part of our faith we promise “to respect the dignity of every human being,” If we are to mean what we promise than we must act.

Many of us are stricken by fear.  Fear that as individuals we cannot do anything.  Fear that we are a little shepherd boy with no armor sent to battle the massive giant who is protected by a thick and glorious suit of armor.  But that fear should not hold us back.

The lectionary today gives us the story of David and Goliath.  David was indeed that little shepherd boy but he was also the shepherd boy who had faith in God.

But David said to Saul, “Your servant used to keep sheep for his father; and whenever a lion or a bear came, and took a lamb from the flock, I went after it and struck it down, rescuing the lamb from its mouth; and if it turned against me, I would catch it by the jaw, strike it down, and kill it. Your servant has killed both lions and bears;………. The LORD, who saved me from the paw of the lion and from the paw of the bear, will save me from the hand of this Philistine.” So Saul said to David, “Go, and may the LORD be with you!”

We know how the rest of the reading goes.   Goliath baits David, and David uses the tools he had from his everyday life and defeated the giant against everyone’s expectations.   David had faith, faith to overcome his fear.  I’m sure that he was scared, who would not be.  But he had seen how the Lord had protected him before and he had the faith that the Lord his God would protect him in the task ahead.

Compare that to the disciples in our Gospel reading.   They were full of fear, fear that the great windstorm that was crashing waves over and into the boat would sink the ship.   In their fear, they ran to the Lord and woke him up.   The Lord said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” Then the wind ceased, and there was a dead calm.  He then questioned the disciples “Why are you afraid? Have you still no faith?”

How much better that we be like David the Shepherd boy than the disciples?   But if we can’t then let us learn from the disciples, that even in our greatest fear Jesus will not let us down.

So we come back to our need to act.  Our need to do something to break down racism in our country.    I do not have a perfect answer for you.   However we must look at the gun laws in our country.    There have been too many deaths to let things stay as they are.   We must do everything that we can to turn our social justice rhetoric and activism into concrete actions that allow our African-American brothers and sisters to live a life that is equal to all people of this nation.  

How do we do that?  What can we do?  You and me?   We can support all of those things I just said but there is something else that we can do.  Importantly we have the power of forgiveness and love to fight racism and injustice whenever we see it.

You may say to me that showing love and forgiveness to a person who is being racist to whatever extent is extremely hard, if not impossible, it is indeed like sending David out to fight Goliath.    I know it is hard and something that many people will struggle with, but I want to share with you one of the most powerful images from this past week.

At Dylann Roof’s court bond hearing on Friday, relatives of his victims were allowed to address him via a video link.   Nadine Collier, a daughter of Ethel Lance, one of Roof’s victims, said the following to him at the hearing.

“I just want everybody to know, to you, I forgive you. You took something very precious away from me. I will never talk to her ever again, I will never be able to hold her again. But I forgive you. And have mercy on your soul. You hurt me, you hurt a lot of people. But God forgives you, and I forgive you.”

The story of David and Goliath was retold this week.

We can make a difference if we confront racism whenever we come across it.

We confront, we forgive and we show Christ’s love.

I know that it is hard, especially when we are hurting and the pain caused by someone else is as raw as the pain people are feeling now.  But as Christians we are called to act.

We confront, we forgive and we show Christ’s love.

Today the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church reopened and continued the hard work of doing something.  The name Emanuel means “God is with us”.

My prayer for us today is that as brothers and sisters in Christ that we will act to break down racism in our time.  As brothers and sisters in Christ that we will raise up those who have been downtrodden.   As brothers and sisters in Christ that we will act in faith starting with sharing the gospel of love and forgiveness to all, respecting the dignity of every human being.

Amen.

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When You Are Engulfed In Flames

by David Sedaris

I have this habit with books, once I start one I am determined to finish it. A book that takes me two days to read is very good (in my opinion) a book that takes longer……. I started to read David Sedaris’s book about nine months ago.

I appreciate books that are mini essays. I really like books that describe real life and are sharp in their observations, plus if they are witty then all the better. This book has it’s moments, some characters are very well developed, occasionally the last sentence of a chapter reveals a thought or an alternative perspective. For me though, the book lacked direction. All the way up to the last few pages I was hoping for a final twist that would tie everything together, but it never came.

The final chapter did have one gem of a line “If God knows that I don’t believe in him, why would he go out of his way to help me?” – I’ll come back to that one.